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Ending on a High Note

Steve Fisher joined the SDSU School of Music and Dance as a guest conductor as it closed its 75th anniversary celebration with a musical masterpiece.
"Carmina Burana" musicians smile after the encore performance. Photo by Pia Ruggles

Performing before a sold-out-crowd, students, faculty and alumni of the School of Music and Dance presented Carmina Burana on Tuesday, May 8, at the Don Powell Theatre.

The multi-movement cantata is written for a chorus, orchestra and soloists — ideally designed to highlight the talents of students in the school.

Steve Fisher
Steve Fisher (Photo by Pia Ruggles)

About "Carmina Burana"

Carmina Burana is one of the most popular pieces of music ever written. A movement within the work, “O Fortuna” has been featured in soundtracks to numerous television commercials and films, including Natural Born Killers, Excalibur, Speed and Badlands.

The performance was the final event in a year-long celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the School of Music and Dance.

To kick-off the evening’s performance, Tim Taylor from Council member Marti Emerald’s office presented Dean Joyce Gattas and Donna Conaty, director of the school, with a proclamation signed by the San Diego City Council and Mayor declaring May 8, 2012 “SDSU School of Music and Dance Day.”

Guest conductor Steve Fisher

Before "Carmina Burana," Dean Gattas introduced Men’s Basketball Coach Steve Fisher who conducted a short march written for SDSU in the 1960s called “Sons of Q.”

Coach Fisher, who claimed to be nervous, took the stage and expertly directed the student and alumni musicians.

The audience erupted in rousing applause for his direction, and Shannon Kitelinger, director of bands for the school of music and dance, coaxed Coach Fisher back onto the stage for another round of applause and a plaque commemorating his conducting debut.

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