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Milestone for Storm Nasatir Project

A topping out ceremony took place to mark the end of steel-frame construction.
Before it was raised, the beam was signed by President Elliot Hirshman, Dean Paul Wong, Charles and Chinyeh Hostler and the tradesmen working on the project.
Before it was raised, the beam was signed by President Elliot Hirshman, Dean Paul Wong, Charles and Chinyeh Hostler and the tradesmen working on the project.

Since June 2012, two of the older buildings on the San Diego State University campus have been undergoing a major transformation. And while the project isn’t scheduled to be completed until August 2014, a traditional topping out ceremony took place at the Storm Nasatir Building Complex renovation project this week.

The topping out, or placing of the final steel beam, typically signifies a major milestone in the life of a construction project. At the Storm Nasatir Building Complex project, the ceremony marked the completion of steel-frame construction.

Before it was raised, the beam was signed by the tradesmen who work on the project as well as members of the SDSU community and special guest Ambassador Charles Hostler and his wife Chinyeh Hostler. As a tribute to their long-time support of SDSU, the university will name the new west building of Storm Hall as the Charles Hostler Building.

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Ambassador Charles Hostler and his wife Chinyeh Hostler were among those who signed the beam.

Project update

To date work within Storm Hall and Nasatir Hall continues to progress as both interior and exterior framing, HVAC and eectrical rough-in work is now mostly complete.  Most recently underground hydronic piping and steam vault construction has commenced.  Over the next several months construction will focus on roofing work, installing windows and door frames, followed by drywall in Storm Hall and Nasatir Hall.  The next major milestone for the project will be pouring the concrete decks at the new lecture halls.

Modern amenities

Once completed, the renovations to the existing 137,700 square-foot Storm Nasatir Building Complex will offer upgraded program space for eight academic departments from the College of Arts and Letters.

The renovations will include new and upgraded classroom technologies, academic and research laboratories, and faculty offices. Renovations will also include two new lecture halls with 275 and 475 seats, and a small food service facility/convenience store.

Architecturally, the renovations will provide new windows and an exterior finish to improve the building’s energy efficiency.  New elevators, ramps, site work and door operators will be provided to assure wheelchair access.
Deficiencies in the existing buildings that will be addressed include the provision of new code-compliant heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, new lighting and ceiling systems, telephone and data system upgrades, fire alarm, security and electrical.

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The topping out, or placing of the final steel beam, typically signifies a major milestone in the life of a construction project.

Long-term savings

The renovations will save the university millions of dollars in deferred and ongoing maintenance costs. The project will eliminate building code and health and safety code deficiencies, significantly reduce water use and will decrease energy consumption with the inclusion of a 120 kWh Photo Voltaic installation to produce 170,000 kWh/year; a savings of $28,560 per year.

At a cost of $73,048,000, this largely state-funded project will be paid for with $62,803,000 in state construction funds,  along with a $10,245,000 investment from non-state funded support.

The project architect is LPA, Inc. The general contractor is CW Driver.  It is estimated this project will create 485 new jobs and generate $70 million worth of economic benefit to the region during construction.

History of the buildings

The west wing of the social sciences building on campus was renamed Storm Hall in honor of Alvena Storm, who joined the SDSU faculty in 1926 and taught there for 40 years, coming to be known as an expert on the geography of California and the West.

Nasatir Hall was named in honor of Abraham P. Nasatir, professor emeritus of history, who taught at SDSU for 46 years, from 1928-1974.

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