Tuesday, October 17, 2017

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Women Gain Ground in Television Industry

The annual Boxed In Report finds more women in key behind-the-scenes roles and speaking parts in television.
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Women continue to gain ground in key behind-the-scenes roles in prime-time television, according to the latest Boxed In report released today by Martha Lauzen, executive director of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University.   

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Women accounted for 28 percent of creators, executive producers, producers, directors, writers, editors and directors of photography working on prime-time programs in 2012-2013.

Women accounted for 28 percent of creators, executive producers, producers, directors, writers, editors and directors of photography working on prime-time programs in 2012-2013 — an increase of two percentage points from 2011-12 and a recent historical high.

Now in its 16th year, the study provides the most complete historical record of women’s employment in television available.

Long-term trends

"While our annual Celluloid Ceiling study indicates that women continue to languish on screen and behind-the-scenes in top-grossing films, the latest Boxed In report suggests that the percentages of women are slowly but steadily increasing in television,” said Lauzen. “We are seeing a long-term trend of incremental growth for women in prime-time."

In addition to monitoring women’s behind-the-scenes employment, Boxed In also tracks the percentage of female characters on screen, as well as various demographic characteristics. 

In 2012-2013, females comprised 43 percent of all speaking characters.  This figure is even with the historical high set in 2007-2008.  However, many gender stereotypes remain.  Female characters remain younger than their male counterparts and are less likely than males to be seen at work and actually working.  

This year’s study also reports the findings of an expanded sample including programs airing on the broadcast networks, on basic and paid cable channels and available through Netflix. 

The Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University conducts an extensive agenda of original research on women working on-screen and behind-the-scenes.