Friday, November 24, 2017

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This year's Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting is being held at the San Diego Convention Center. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons) This year's Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting is being held at the San Diego Convention Center. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)
 


SDSU Well-Represented at Largest Neuroscience Meeting

Dozens of faculty and students are presenting their work this week at the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting.
By Michael Price
 

San Diego State University students and faculty from a range of research disciplines are presenting their latest findings this week in San Diego at the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, currently underway and running through Nov. 16. The meeting is the largest neuroscience-focused conference in the world with more than 30,000 expected to attend.

In total, 17 SDSU faculty and 44 students will be presenting—or are listed as co-authors on—research at the meeting in the form of symposiums and poster sessions.

Five students from the lab of Harsimran “Sim” Baweja, director of the SDSU Neuromechanics and Neuroplasticity Laboratory, are presenting posters at the meeting. Four undergraduate students and one graduate student will be showcasing their research on topics such as balance deficit and stroke; balance deficit and Parkinson’s disease; balance issues in concussed athletes; and balance in relation to dual-tasking in older adults. They will also be revealing baseline balance data on 6,500 athletes between the ages of 10 and 25—the largest such database ever produced. Such data has the potential to greatly improve concussion detection in athletes using balance testing.

Baweja takes pride in the fact that all of the students from his lab attending the conference are doing so using funding from the SDSU Division of Undergraduate Studies research mini-grants and the College of Sciences Instructionally Related Activities funds.

“This conference is a great platform for students to network and to meet with mentors and collaborators," Baweja said. "We’re only able to send as many students as we are because of the university funding we’ve received."

Baweja will also be co-presenting his own neuromechanics work on why triathletes have difficulty switching from cycling to running during a race.