Tuesday, October 17, 2017

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Jayla Lee is pursuing a master’s degree in communication with a specialization in mass communication and media studies. Jayla Lee is pursuing a master’s degree in communication with a specialization in mass communication and media studies.
 


Jayla Lee’s Aztec Experience

This Aztec is a graduate teaching assistant in the School of Journalism and Media Studies.
By SDSU News Team
 

Name: Jayla Lee
Major (and minor): Master’s degree in communication with a specialization in mass communication and media
studies
Campus affiliations: SDSU School of Journalism and Media Studies (JMS), SDSU Media Relations

1. Why did you choose San Diego State University?

I chose SDSU because it offered me the resources to make my dreams a reality. Along with admission to its journalism program, I received a job offer from JMS Director Bey-Ling Sha to be a graduate teaching assistant. In the weeks following, I visited SDSU for the first time and fell in love. The campus struck me as a welcoming community that I could see myself growing in. I met with the JMS faculty, who immediately demonstrated a genuine interest in my goals as a student.

2. What inspired you to apply for your program?

After earning my bachelor's degree in communication studies from Sacramento State and joining its Public Affairs team, I realized my passion was to continue working in university relations in the California State University system and someday teach in it. This is what inspired me to pursue my master's degree in mass communication and media studies. I hope to receive an education that will allow me to give back exponentially more through my career.

3. What is the best piece of advice you ever received?

I have been blessed with numerous pieces of advice throughout my journey, all leading to a common theme. Sacramento State President Robert S. Nelsen said it best: "A quality education is more than just the attainment of knowledge. It is the magnification of the heart." President Nelsen also encouraged me to take on my next steps at SDSU. With that, I indeed am pursuing this next step as a matter of the heart.

4. Which SDSU faculty or staff member has been the most influential throughout your SDSU journey?


My gratitude extends to the family I have gained here at SDSU—from my classmates and co-workers, to the faculty and staff I have worked with thus far. The two standouts for me are Sha and Rebecca Nee. Director Sha has been a great support this semester and made it possible for me to be involved with JMS as a graduate teaching assistant. Professor Nee has been a mentor to me as I was her teaching assistant. She is the type of professor I hope to become.

5. What does student success mean to you?

To me, student success means exceeding the goals of what you believed possible for yourself. This could mean writing a paper that turns into your thesis and contributing new ideas to a topic of research. This could mean applying your major to an internship, and touching another person's life in a big or small way. Ultimately, it means seeing yourself through to the other side of a challenge, even when times are tough.

6. What experience at SDSU has changed your life the most?

Being a graduate teaching assistant has changed my life the most. In the past, I got to be the student and also interview students for stories. Now, I get to be in a classroom with them and dive into discussion about topics on social media. Since this is a fairly new subject in the academic world, we are learning together.

7. Where do you see yourself in five years?


In five years, I see myself becoming a member and contributor to the academic community in San Diego, giving back and helping other students succeed.

8. What’s your favorite thing about being an Aztec?

My favorite thing is being a part of the Aztec family. I have made some cherished friendships here from all around the world, from my classes to my next door neighbor, and we are united in an awesome Aztec pride.