Tuesday, June 27, 2017

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Jason De Léon is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and the director of the Undocumented Migration Project. (Credit: Jason De Léon) Jason De Léon is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and the director of the Undocumented Migration Project. (Credit: Jason De Léon)
 


Adams Lecture in the Humanities with Jason De Léon

The 23rd annual Adams Lecture in Humanities is sponsored by the Department of Classics and Humanities.
By Rhoda Nevins
 

The Department of Classics and Humanities at San Diego State University will host a lecture by Jason De Léon, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and director of the Undocumented Migration Project, a long-term anthropological study of clandestine border crossings between Latin America and the United States. The program will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center. The event is free and open to the public.

De Léon’s presentation, “Up Close and Out of Focus: Life, Death, and the Ethics of Visualizing Human Smuggling Across Mexico,” will focus on a photoethnographic project depicting the violent day-to-day lives of Honduran smugglers who profit by moving Central Americans across Mexico. He will highlight both the complicated and often short lives of these individuals, while trying to visually represent their experiences.

The lecture is accompanied by a photography exhibition, “The Other Side of the Wall: Photographs of the Central American Migrant Experience Crossing Mexico,” in the Research Services section of SDSU's Love Library, located on the first floor of the Library Addition. A preview of the exhibit can be viewed at 3:30 p.m., immediately following the lecture. The photos and curation are by De León and Michael Wells, with photographs based on research conducted by the Undocumented Migration Project.

De Léon’s recent book, "The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail," which features photos by Wells, was awarded the 2016 Margaret Mead Award. Wells has served as the primary photographer for the Undocumented Migration Project since its inception in 2009 and has photographed that project’s ethnographic and archaeological fieldwork in Arizona, New York, Mexico, and Ecuador.

The Adams Lecture Series is made possible through the John R. and Jane F. Adams Endowment.

For further information, please visit the Department of Classics and Humanities website or call 619-594-5186.