Tuesday, August 14, 2018

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David Fobes, Psycho dos us, 2017; courtesy of the artist David Fobes, Psycho dos us, 2017; courtesy of the artist
 


Surrealism Exhibition Transforms SDSU’s Downtown Gallery

SDSU faculty and students' art showcase academic and artistic process.
By Elizabeth Allison
 

“By including work from Arts Alive SDSU collaborative courses, we’re demonstrating the academic bridge between SDSU downtown space and the main campus.”

A new surrealism art exhibit at San Diego State University’s Downtown Gallery explores human existence and transports viewers into the mind’s eye of local artists.

The “Transforming Existence” exhibition, which runs through April 8, is comprised of artwork inspired by the likes of Salvador Dali and Dorothea Tanning, and created by faculty and students from SDSU’s School of Art and Design.

Surrealism began in the 1920s as a cultural force in literature, fashion, photography, cinema, architecture and art. Using fantastical colors and dreamlike images, it delved into the unconscious mind and challenged the laws of reason and logic. Many elements of the historic art movement are still vital and relevant forces in today’s creative world, as demonstrated in the latest SDSU Downtown Gallery exhibition.

“Transforming Existence” is the fourth in a series of annual exhibitions inspired by SDSU’s campus-wide initiative called the Common Experience. That program aims to increase interactions among students, faculty and staff through an array of academic endeavors, including lectures, seminars and activities. This year’s theme is Experience Imagination.

From drawing to digital art and interior design, every area of study within the SDSU School of Art and Design is represented in the “Transforming Existence” collection. There are also several pieces of interactive art—giving way to a mind-bending visitor-generated experience.

In addition, “Transforming Existence” features work created during last year’s Arts Alive SDSU Interdisciplinary Teaching Exchange. As part of the program, a biology course and graphic design course collaborated on a project using bacteria to create artistic typography designs.

“By including work from Arts Alive SDSU collaborative courses, we’re demonstrating the academic bridge between SDSU downtown space and the main campus,” said Chantel Paul, director of the SDSU Downtown Galley. “Visitors to the gallery will be able to see both the academic and artistic process involved in creating a final product.”  

The SDSU Downtown Gallery is open to the public and admission is free.