Home
SDSU is the only program in the U.S. to offer a sustainable tourism curriculum at the undergraduate level.

Story Highlights

  • More than green tourism
  • One of a kind
  • International study required
SDSU is the only program in the U.S. to offer a sustainable tourism curriculum at the undergraduate level.
Page Tools
Descrease font size Increase font sizeText SizesPrint pagePrintBookmark and ShareRSSRSS

Thinking about your summer travel plans? So are tourism industry executives in millions of vacation spots around the globe.

Which destinations will attract tourist dollars depends on more than the allure of stunning vistas, entertainment and exotic food. More than ever, discerning travelers want assurances that that their adventures won't leave a giant footprint in the sand or on the rainforest floor. 

Sustainable tourism reflects this growing awareness of the cultural, environmental, economic and political impacts of travel.

More than green tourism

"It's more than green tourism," said Vinod Sasidharan, coordinator of the recreation and tourism management program at San Diego State University.

"Sustainable tourism supports the economic viability of a city or region's industry while respecting the local ecology, resources and culture."

One of a kind

SDSU is the only program in the U.S. to offer a sustainable tourism curriculum at the undergraduate level. The four-year degree allows students to explore issues at the intersection of the tourism industry and the community, such as: transportation, migration, communication, unemployment, education, natural resources and economic development. 

"Our students understand the sustainability of the business of tourism, which is a broader concept than "tourism management," Sasidharan said. "We teach them that green tourism and corporate social responsibility are not separate pieces to be shoehorned into existing operations."

International study required

The program is one of 11 at SDSU that requires an international component. Students have traveled as far afield as Finland, Romania, South Africa, Fiji and Turkey to study sustainable tourism practices.

Sasidharan, whose research has been funded by the Peace Corps, the National Park Service and the philanthropic Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said SDSU's program is training critical thinkers who will join the travel and tourism industry with sound knowledge and hands-on experiences in global tourism sustainability, from both operational and management standpoints.

SDSUniverse green issue

This article is part of the SDSUniverse "green" special issue.

 

Page ToolsDescrease font size Increase font sizeText SizesPrint pagePrintBookmark and ShareRSSRSS
blog comments powered by Disqus

MULTIMEDIA

1936 Mural Finds New Home in SDSU Library
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
SDSU anthropology professor Seth Mallios describes a nearly 80-year-old mural rediscovered in Hardy Tower that was unveiled, Oct. 5, in the SDSU Library.

also inside SDSUniverse

Watch SDSU videos on YouTube
Contribute
SDSUniverse welcomes submissions of interest to faculty and staff from all campus areas.