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Saturday, December 15, 2018

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The top dance ensemble will perform this weekend. The top dance ensemble will perform this weekend.
 


The Magic of Movement

SDSU's University Dance Company performance will embody the dance school’s key principles.
By Teresa Monaco
 

The University Dance Company performs April 29 through May 1 in the San Diego State University Dance Studio.

The challenging evening-length work combines dance-making processes directed by SDSU faculty J Dellecave, Joseph Alter, Jess Humphrey and Leslie Seiters to create a fascinating movement experience. Tickets are $5 for students, $10 general admission, and can be purchased online.

Known for their fiery exploration of black and white, presence and absence, and the myriad dichotomies that humans face throughout the course of life, the University Dance Company’s examination of the human condition begs the audience to behold a group of fully present human beings dancing their hearts out.

An alternative perspective

SDSU takes an explorative approach to dance.

“A lot of what we’re doing is about asking questions with our entire bodies, experimenting with dance, and asking ‘what is dance’ through the dance that we make,” said Humphrey, a dance faculty member.

“In our program, we’re not distinguishing choreography and improvisation from each other. When you’re composing a dance, it’s more live and in the moment rather than being done ahead of time.”

Exploring life through dance

This University Dance Company performance will embody some of the dance school’s key principles.

“In our making process, most practices have involved confronting and challenging situations that can produce flatness," Seiters said. "We practice voluminousness in the face of pressures to remember choreography, be seen, be quick and be in the full presence of each other, ourselves in the studio mirrors, observers and audiences.”

The Dance students and faculty hope to create an environment that is wide, deep, spacious and creates volume for performers and viewers, even in the face of flatness.