Monday, November 20, 2017

Follow SDSU  Follow SDSU on Twitter Follow SDSU on Facebook Follow SDSU on Google+ SDSU RSS Feed

Fourteen students from the College of Sciences at SDSU were awarded scholarships courtesy of the ARCS San Diego chapter. Fourteen students from the College of Sciences at SDSU were awarded scholarships courtesy of the ARCS San Diego chapter.
 


Support for High-Achieving STEM Students

Fourteen SDSU students receive scholarships from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation.
By SDSU News Team
 

Fourteen students from the College of Sciences are receiving scholarships from an organization with a long history of supporting SDSU students. SDSU hosted four representatives from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation (ARCS) for a formal ceremony this week that marked the foundation’s 29th year of giving to the university.

Since 1988, the ARCS San Diego chapter has provided scholarships for SDSU students in the fields of natural sciences, bio-medicine and engineering. Each of this year’s 14 winners will receive $7,500 for a total gift of $105,000 from ARCS.

“ARCS shares our vision of the importance of scientific achievement,” said SDSU President Elliot Hirshman. “Over the past 29 years, ARCS has supported more than 88 SDSU students in the STEM fields with scholarships totaling more than $2.8 million. By supporting our students, ARCS members are leaving an important legacy.”

Scholarship winners

This year’s 14 student recipients and their areas of study are:

Peter Calhoun - computational sciences
Daniel Cuevas - computational sciences
Liwen Deng - biology
Bryan Hancock - biology
Sean Maddox - biochemistry
Paul Maier - biology
Brian Maniaci - biochemistry
Megan Monsanto- biology
Erik Paulson - biochemistry
Stephen Rice - biology
Kelly Ross - biology
Colette Smirniotis - computational sciences
Winston Stauffer - biology
Ryan Strum - physics

About Achievement Rewards for College Scientists

The San Diego Chapter of ARCS is one of 16 chapters across the country dedicated to helping the best and brightest United States graduate and undergraduate students working toward degrees in the natural sciences, medicine and engineering.

The non-profit, all-women, volunteer organization was formed nationally in 1958 in response to Sputnik and the lack of U.S. supremacy in the technology race.