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Sunday, May 16, 2021

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Arts Alive SDSU Festival happening along Campanile Walkway on May 2. Arts Alive SDSU Festival happening along Campanile Walkway on May 2.
 


Arts Alive SDSU Festival Returns to Campanile Walkway

Showcase of art, music, film and much more returns to campus for the third year in a row.
By Elizabeth Allison
 

The third annual Arts Alive SDSU Festival returns to campus on Thursday, May 2. This all-day campus arts festival runs from 10 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. along Campanile Walkway.

The festival will showcase an eclectic variety of art, literature, dance, film, music, and theatre and feature live performances, exhibits, demonstrations, and interactive art-making activities.

A Multi-Disciplinary Event

Earlier in the year, the SDSU community was invited to submit work and get involved in the festival. More than 100 individuals were selected to participate, either by performing or having their work displayed.

“The festival is an opportunity to celebrate the artistic activities that permeate the SDSU community,” said Eric Smigel, chair of Arts Alive SDSU. “The event also serves as an affirmation that our entire campus is a platform for creativity.”

Among the activities scheduled for the festival are live performances in front of Hepner Hall. These will include scenes from several Shakespearean plays, performances by students and faculty in the SDSU Division of Dance, a live DJ, and spoken word poetry.

Visual art pieces will be displayed across Campanile Walkway. With more than 50 unique works, this one-day exhibition will include paintings, ceramic sculptures, theatre set design models, graphic design posters, and a 13-foot geodesic dome, among other pieces.

The Arts Alive SDSU Festival will also feature interactive activities and a collection of short student films screened throughout the day.

Additionally, this multi-disciplinary event showcases the talent of those behind the scenes whose logistical management make a large event like this happen. The festival is being produced in partnership with an upper-division course in the School of Theatre, Television, and Film in which students gain theoretical and practical experience in professional production management.

“It has been exciting to receive the influx of diverse entries,” said Smigel, “and a pleasure to work with the students in Jay Sheehan’s production class to determine how best to present such a vast array of visual and performing arts.”

The Arts Alive SDSU Festival is free and open to the public.